Numbers with Plant Material

This tutorial has three techniques for making numerals from plant material. I’m sure you will be able to adapt them for your particular needs!

 

Using Small Branches and Flowers

This example uses tortured willow and banksia.

Plant numbers 11. Use a green willow branch to make a circle by twisting it around itself. Allow to fully dry – about 2 weeks.

 

 

 

Plant Numbers 22. Using florist glue attach sections of banksia (in this case cut slices of the flower) at intervals. It’s a good idea to leave some spaces as these create interest in your design and allow the judge to see your base circle as well.

 

 

Plant Numbers 33. Finished and ready for your design.

 

 

 

 

Feature Twigs and Beads/Berries

This example uses spent berry stalks from a palm tree flower.

PLant numbers 41. Cut twigs/sticks/stalks to desired length and lay out ready for gluing.

 

 

 

PLant numbers 52. Attach small beads or berries to one end of the twig using florist glue or PVA. (Note: I use florist glue as it dries much more quickly and works even when your plant material is still a bit moist.)

 

 

Plant numbers 63. Use a piece of discarded floral foam to rest your work until it is completely dry.

These will be used as features within a group of twigs.

 

 

Bundling Twigs

This example uses small twigs from gum tree branches and stripped palm berry flower spikes.

Plant numbers 71. Group together a number of the same size twigs and cover liberally with PVA glue so that they have the opportunity to stick to one another. Leave to dry completely, at least 24 hours.

 

 

Plant numbers 82. For rounded shapes, bundle semi dry plant material with standard wire for a minimum 7 days. Replace the standard wire with decorative wire and complete the numeral with the straight sections of twigs made using step 1.

 

 

Here is an example of a finished design (suspension) with the title – “Fireworks Celebrating 150 Years”. It uses all the techniques above for the 5 and 0, the 1 is made from pieces of curled bark.

 

Suspension - 150 Years

 

 

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